muensterbergTo Hugo Münsterberg
75 Monmouth Street
Brookline, Massachusetts. September 16. 1897

Dear Professor Münsterberg,

Your charming little volume had by some oversight not been sent on to me, and I found it here only the other day on my arrival. I didn’t know you also yielded sometimes to poetical temptation, and I have read your poems through with great delight. It seems to me—although I fear my judgment of German verse isn’t worth much—that they breathe the spirit of the lovable and inspired Germany of pre-prussian days, and are truly ideal. What you have to say about America also hits me, especially that description of Yankee freedom—freedom to walk on the track! But you are too favourable to the ladies; they are so shrill. Thank you very much for sending me the book.

I am not living in Cambridge this year, but here at my mother’s. Nevertheless I hope to have frequent opportunities of seeing you and Mrs Münsterberg. It is a great satisfaction to every one in these parts that you have decided to remain for good.

Yours very truly,
G Santayana

From The Letters of George Santayana:  Book One, [1868]-1909.  Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2001. Location of manuscript: Department of Rare Books and Manuscripts, Boston Public Library, Boston MA


William_McKinley_by_Courtney_Art_Studio,_1896To Susan Sturgis de Sastre
Oxford, England. September 15, 1901

I see you look on Mc Kinley’s end as a judgment of heaven. There were other people probably far more guilty in respect to the war, which I am afraid could not have been avoided in the end, given Spanish inefficiency and the sentimental and acquisitive instincts of the American public. The worst of this accident is that Rooseveldt is not a safe person; but responsibility may sober him and he may be able to resist the machine better than a mere bell-wether like Mc Kinley.

From The Letters of George Santayana:  Book One, [1868]-1909. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2001.
Location of manuscript: Alderman Library, University of Virginia at Charlottesville


Mount-OlympusTo Edward Joseph Harrington O’Brien
3 Prescott Hall
COLONIAL CLUB
Cambridge, Massachusetts. [September 1908-January 1912]

Dear Mr. O’Brien: We are besieged at this moment by soi-disant philosophers from all over the country, and I shall not be my own master until Saturday. If you could come to tea then or on Sunday, at about four o’clock, I should be delighted to see you.

Perhaps you would explain to me then some of the things you refer to in your letter, which I don’t quite understand. The tempests of the Olympians to not reach my catacomb.

Yours very truly,
G Santayana

From The Letters of George Santayana:  Book One, [1868]-1909.  Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2001.
Location of manuscript: Collection of Alan Denson, Aberdeenshire, Scotland


VeniceTo Charles Augustus Strong
HÔTEL ROYAL DANIELI
Venice, Italy. September 13, 1931

Dear Strong,

(This change in my handwriting is caused by the hotel pen.)

I was surprised and pleased to find your letter. I am afraid we may find the Hôtel de Londres a bit shabby: they are charging me 55 lire a day for half-pension, with a “good” room and bathroom: but we shall see.

I came here yesterday by motorbus and motor launch: not a bad trip: and I found Venice en fête on account of the King’s visit, of which I was ignorant. I have a room in the entresol of the old building, almost on the quay, and it is amusing after the Alpine solitudes of Cortina. I had been left at the hotel with half a dozen ladies, some of which had an odd look and very blond hair. Perhaps they were friends of the proprietor and clerks, being entertained in the absence of the Herrschaften.

Yours ever,
G.S.

From The Letters of George Santayana:  Book Four, 19281932.  Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2003.
Location of manuscript: Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow NY


NaplesTo Charles Augustus Strong
BERTOLINI’S PALACE
Naples, Italy. September 12, 1912

Some other day I may answer the part of your letter about psychology: today I am hardly in the mood. You are quite right in saying that we disagree about the existence of unfelt feeling. I am not sure, however, that an unfelt feeling is a fact and not a word. I agree that there is something in an animal before he is aware of it—a very great deal, in fact. This is what I meant by the fact on which we agreed and the words about which we disagreed.

From The Letters of George Santayana:  Book Two, 1910-1920.  Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2001.
Location of manuscript: Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow NY